Public Relations with an Investor Relations Twist

By Danny Cavanaugh

I’ve always considered myself to be an adequate writer, however I knew I never wanted to be a journalist. I have all the respect in the world for journalists, but I always told my parents at a young age that I was going to be a business man.

So, how could I get involved in the world of business with a PR major? The answer is Investor Relations.

497188132_1280x720

Now you may be wondering, Investor Relations? What the hell is that?

IR is simply the ability to take a company’s financials and then tell the story of the company through those financials. In other words, tell employees, customers, shareholders and investors how the company is doing in order for them to invest in the company.

Although it may be a difficult path to get into IR, this is my ultimate career goal. Sure, I’m not an accounting major or a financial analyst, however I believe I can achieve an abundance of success through my PR background, along with the business minor I’ve obtained at CWU.

Besides, I’ve always been good with talking to people and I have common sense.. for the most part. So, why not set the bar high right?

handshake-440959_960_720.jpg

With that said, IR professionals have a wide range of duties including: releasing earnings reports to the public and SEC, leading financial analyst briefings and handling the PR side of a financial crisis.

Now, I may have only taken a couple accounting classes, but I know I have the potential and the skills to succeed within this type of career. Overall, there are many career paths you can take with a Public Relations degree.

But you see, my goal is to work on the business side of PR.. Investor Relations.

How to get your pitch recognized

By Danny Cavanaugh

Pitching newsworthy stories to the media is essential for any PR pro. Whether you’re trying to give your organization an edge by winning over a journalist for the story you want, or you’re trying to promote your client within the local news, pitches are key in the daily life of a PR pro.

With that said, how many pitches do journalists receive every day? According to Nicole Fallon Taylor, she received “an average of 23 per workday,” prdaily.com. This is unfortunate because of how saturated journalist’s emails are becoming.

So, the big question is how can we get our pitch recognized, and not just thrown out?

Image result for Public relations

First of all,  make sure what you are pitching is newsworthy. In other words, is the audience going to be interested in your particular story? If your story isn’t newsworthy, the journalist won’t waste their time with you again.

Secondly, make the pitch personalized. Often times when you try to build a relationship with journalists and mention their name in the pitch, you will have a better chance of getting your pitch recognized. There’s nothing worse than saying “to whom it may concern.” That’s bad PR.

Lastly, be creative! According to Taylor, the pitches she accepted didn’t say the same old thing as everyone else. The pitches she accepted had a different outlook on a story, or a whole new perspective that was interesting.

Just remember, as a PR pro you will write pitches in your career. Have fun with them, make them personalized, newsworthy, and be creative in your pitch. There’s nothing worse than a bland, non-relevant pitch!

 

 

Inauguration Day Drama

By Danny Cavanaugh

It’s no secret that President Trump isn’t the most popular president of all time. But, is it just me or does it seem like the presidency has been based on a popularity contest, rather than on policies to improve America?

On Inauguration Day, (Jan. 20,2017) it was reported that a smaller crowd (in comparison to former President, Barack Obama’s turnout) had come to support the new president. Press Secretary Sean Spicer shortly thereafter was accused of spinning the truth about the actual turnout.

Of course this was a mistake by Spicer, but I don’t think he was knowingly trying to “spin” the truth. I agree with Beki Winchel when she states, “PR pros should think twice about how they present details of a recent event or an executive’s move that has elicited backlash,” prdaily.com.

donald_trump_swearing_in_ceremony

It’s interesting to me how a man’s failure to elaborate and tell the whole story can have such backlash. Now, rather than focusing on President Trump’s first actions as president, we see the media talking about that “popularity contest” with the turnout for Mr. Trump’s inauguration.

With that said, PR pros can learn a lot from this situation. The availability and access to information via social media can cause a crisis in a matter of seconds.

So, how do we avoid these crises?

Answer: tell the truth, tell it all, tell it fast, and move on.

This leads back to my initial point, give Spicer a break! The man is human and he simply forgot to elaborate on what the turnout was.

At least Spicer was able to see the mistake he made, and create a statement about his lack of communication and specification on the matter.

As a society we need to stop nit picking every little thing somebody says, it isn’t healthy. As we have seen, Spicer meant that the turnout was the largest in years with people tuning in via web, television, and social media (along with in person).

PR pros should be warned from this. Somebody is always looking to fact check what you are saying. Be careful, and remember to tell the truth, tell it all, tell it fast, move on, and don’t be afraid to say “I don’t know.”